Lead as a Team

dereko@saddleback.com
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed May 23, 2018 2:17 am

Lead as a Team

Postby dereko@saddleback.com » Fri May 04, 2018 11:54 am





cas.sufficool@gmail.com
Posts: 36
Joined: Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:26 pm

Rockbridge Student

Postby cas.sufficool@gmail.com » Sat Oct 27, 2018 12:25 am

Teamwork can come easily for me or be extremely difficult. I am not sure in what situations my strengths and weaknesses with teamwork arise, but I know that my effort to work as a team can often swing either way. I can often be the lone ranger as he talked about and as he talked about this can be a danger to the ministry. Discovering more about my self in regard to why I do and don’t work well as a team is something I hope to bring before the Lord and have Him reveal to me.

I did appreciate his insight and encouragement to the benefits and necessity of teams. I think understanding and seeing the points he is making will help me to develop better team work. I can see the tremendous strengths to surrounding yourself with wonderful and strong people to help with the ministry. Understanding the benefits of a team is often easier than actually acting on that knowledge, so, does anyone have any simple tips on how to work better in a team?

I appreciated him addressing the need to fight in the spiritual realm when developing the team and the ministry. I believe teams are often broken up because there is a battle in the spiritual realm that drive wedges in-between the relationships the team members are building. Yet, a benefit of having a team is prayer support and accountability, surrounding the ministry with prayer warriors who will fight for the unity of the team and the growth of the ministry is a great tip.

kenthall5@gmail.com
Posts: 51
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:30 pm

Rockbridge Student

Postby kenthall5@gmail.com » Tue Oct 30, 2018 2:55 pm

It is a relief for me to know that leading is best done with a “C-team.” Leading is not one of my spiritual gifts. But working together with others who have a common passion is something I enjoy. The passion builds as we think that we are building eternity. However, the question which comes to mind is, “How do I find and select the right people to be on this team? We tend to want to be around people like ourselves, but in this case, there must be a unique mix of the right passions. This will be one of the challenges for me.

Another challenge that I think we all face as pastors is instilling the concept that every member is a minister. Most churches I have been around contain a vast majority of Sunday morning attenders. We may be lucky to have ten to twenty percent of our membership who have actually become active Christians in the church. Of this group, there are some who have the wrong motivation for doing what they do.

I believe we too often discount the role of prayer in leadership. Without the Lord’s guidance, none of these methods will be fruitful. We know that God answers prayer, but sometimes we forget to listen and watch for His answers.

kenthall5@gmail.com
Posts: 51
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:30 pm

Rockbridge Student

Postby kenthall5@gmail.com » Wed Oct 31, 2018 6:01 pm

Chad, (cas.sufficool@gmail.com)

I think many of us in ministry get into the “if I want something done right…” mentality. It is sometimes tough to surrender control and hope for the best. However, most of us already have enough to do and teambuilding is so appropriate in many ways. The benefits of using teams are biblical.

The thing I need wisdom for is picking the right team members. Perhaps I just get too impatient. I want pick them all at once and get to work. That’s not how God has worked for me. It is always a unique mix of talents and personalities that He provides at the right time for the right jobs.

I have the same question about how to be an effective team leader. I’m sure that it starts with prayer to get the right people and continues in prayer at every point. Ultimately, Jesus has to be the team leader and we all have to be in the Spirit and acting as God’s family.

Kent

janetporter@sandyplains.org
Posts: 63
Joined: Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:49 pm

Re: Rockbridge Student

Postby janetporter@sandyplains.org » Thu Nov 01, 2018 9:34 pm

cas.sufficool@gmail.com wrote:
> Teamwork can come easily for me or be extremely difficult. I am not sure in
> what situations my strengths and weaknesses with teamwork arise, but I know
> that my effort to work as a team can often swing either way. I can often be
> the lone ranger as he talked about and as he talked about this can be a
> danger to the ministry. Discovering more about my self in regard to why I
> do and don’t work well as a team is something I hope to bring before the
> Lord and have Him reveal to me.
>
> I did appreciate his insight and encouragement to the benefits and
> necessity of teams. I think understanding and seeing the points he is
> making will help me to develop better team work. I can see the tremendous
> strengths to surrounding yourself with wonderful and strong people to help
> with the ministry. Understanding the benefits of a team is often easier
> than actually acting on that knowledge, so, does anyone have any simple
> tips on how to work better in a team?
>
> I appreciated him addressing the need to fight in the spiritual realm when
> developing the team and the ministry. I believe teams are often broken up
> because there is a battle in the spiritual realm that drive wedges
> in-between the relationships the team members are building. Yet, a benefit
> of having a team is prayer support and accountability, surrounding the
> ministry with prayer warriors who will fight for the unity of the team and
> the growth of the ministry is a great tip.


I think letting go is one of the hardest obstacles in building a team. I love to be in charge and I had to let go of my way being the only and best way. When I am able to know the end goal and be okay with the path to it being different than mine, I can easily invite others to join me in the mission. Along with letting go, I have been practicing my listening skills and being slow to respond in group situations. I have found that this skill is extremely helpful when building a team. I have discovered that people do want to serve and are most willing when I hear their heart. Like Steve said, people serve better when they know they are valued, which includes listening to them.

janetporter@sandyplains.org
Posts: 63
Joined: Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:49 pm

Rockbridge Student

Postby janetporter@sandyplains.org » Thu Nov 01, 2018 9:50 pm

It makes sense that the foundation takes the longest, but I am not great at being patient enough to complete the task. I tend to rush ahead and most of the time the team building is not complete. I struggle with casting the vision to the team, if I have even taken time to put a team together. I either give too much information or not enough and then I default to my old ways of doing it myself. It does take a lot of work to include others in the mission, but I believe that it is worth it. Any advice on how to efficiently and effectively help others to catch the vision?

It is a challenge to seek out people who are not like me and who have strengths that I do not have. We tend to gravitate to people who are similar to ourselves. I agree that a well-rounded team of people will achieve more than a team of one. So, anyone have any creative ways to seek out people who excel in the areas where I do not? How do I find people who compliment me and have a desire to serve on my team?

kenthall5@gmail.com
Posts: 51
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2018 7:30 pm

Rockbridge Student

Postby kenthall5@gmail.com » Fri Nov 02, 2018 2:14 pm

Janet,
I can appreciate what you’re saying about patience; we live in a “right now” generation. I used to call it a “drive-thru” generation, but we progressed (or regressed) even further than that to where we don’t even need to leave home to get things “right now.” But I’ve learned that my Christian life is not like that. It is in God’s timing; to even think that anything should be in “my time” reveals some self-centeredness.

Like you, I almost dread the task of involving others in a mission that is clear in my mind. “Just do it and get it done” is my attitude. Again, this is MY attitude; putting me first rather than God. It only takes a little thought to realize that God has put others here to work together with me as the family of God to accomplish these things.

You have also pointed out another truth when you said, “We tend to gravitate to people who are similar to ourselves.” But that doesn’t provide a group with all the gifts and abilities needed to accomplish a task. You ask a good question – how do we find these people and work successfully with them? My thoughts are to know the types of differences we are looking for and keep our spiritual eyes open to see who God puts on our minds and in our paths.

janetporter@sandyplains.org
Posts: 63
Joined: Mon Oct 22, 2018 9:49 pm

Rockbridge Student

Postby janetporter@sandyplains.org » Fri Nov 02, 2018 9:18 pm

Kent,
You make a good point. First, I need to decide what spiritual gifts and disciplines I am trying to add to my team. This process will take some time and prayer and patience. I definitely need to add this step to my planning process the next time I am building a team!

reidsmith777@gmail.com
Posts: 24
Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2018 3:29 pm

Re: Lead as a Team

Postby reidsmith777@gmail.com » Tue Nov 06, 2018 1:01 am

Great exchanges everyone - LOVE the sincerity and incisive questions. One of the greatest preventable mistakes made by leaders is when they try to carry too much – the “I’ll just do it myself” syndrome. If we follow the examples of Jesus and the Apostle Paul, we will purposefully develop others as they serve alongside us (Luke 6:12–13; 2 Timothy 2:2).

Your health and balance as a leader – not to mention the people you're influencing – is dependent on others who will serve alongside you. Having the right people on your C-team will enhance how you connect with the diversity of people God has placed within your sphere of influence. They will strengthen how people are cared for and can provide feedback that you would not have otherwise received (Proverbs 27:17). The impact of your leadership will be increased exponentially with the support of these trusted leaders who share your passion, but are gifted differently than you.

Whether we are selecting leaders for our C-team or those who can invest in group leaders as a Community Leader / Coach, I think we can find guidance on how to select co-leaders in Luke 6:12-13: “One of those days Jesus went out to a mountainside to pray, and spent the night praying to God. When morning came, he called his disciples to him and chose twelve of them, whom he also designated apostles.” In this passage, Jesus gives us a four-step process for choosing a co-leader:

He prayed – Earnestly seek the Lord for clear direction and wait until you get it.
He called – Initiate a time to personally connect with who He places on your heart.
He chose – Tell prospective co-leaders what you see in them and why you’re choosing them to partner with you (cf. Mt 16:16-19).
He designated – Empower them to champion specific aspects of group life in keeping with how God has graced them.

Kent - I agree many of us can inadvertently skip over this first step, but it is foundational. As we are reminded in 1 Samuel 16:7, people can too easily get swayed by "outward appearance" and miss the more important matters of the heart. Carl - with regard to your question on how to work better as a team, I recommend looking at "The 17 Indisputable Laws of Teamwork: Embrace Them and Empower Your Team" by John C. Maxwell and "The Five Dysfunctions of a Team" by Patrick Lencioni.

dereko@saddleback.com
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed May 23, 2018 2:17 am

Re: Lead as a Team

Postby dereko@saddleback.com » Mon May 13, 2019 6:58 pm

reidsmith777@gmail.com wrote:
> Great exchanges everyone - LOVE the sincerity and incisive questions. One
> of the greatest preventable mistakes made by leaders is when they try to
> carry too much – the “I’ll just do it myself” syndrome. If we follow the
> examples of Jesus and the Apostle Paul, we will purposefully develop others
> as they serve alongside us (Luke 6:12–13; 2 Timothy 2:2).
>
> Your health and balance as a leader – not to mention the people you're
> influencing – is dependent on others who will serve alongside you. Having
> the right people on your C-team will enhance how you connect with the
> diversity of people God has placed within your sphere of influence. They
> will strengthen how people are cared for and can provide feedback that you
> would not have otherwise received (Proverbs 27:17). The impact of your
> leadership will be increased exponentially with the support of these
> trusted leaders who share your passion, but are gifted differently than
> you.
>
> Whether we are selecting leaders for our C-team or those who can invest in
> group leaders as a Community Leader / Coach, I think we can find guidance
> on how to select co-leaders in Luke 6:12-13: “One of those days Jesus went
> out to a mountainside to pray, and spent the night praying to God. When
> morning came, he called his disciples to him and chose twelve of them, whom
> he also designated apostles.” In this passage, Jesus gives us a four-step
> process for choosing a co-leader:
>
> He prayed – Earnestly seek the Lord for clear direction and wait until
> you get it.
> He called – Initiate a time to personally connect with who He places on
> your heart.
> He chose – Tell prospective co-leaders what you see in them and why
> you’re choosing them to partner with you (cf. Mt 16:16-19).
> He designated – Empower them to champion specific aspects of group life
> in keeping with how God has graced them.
>
> Kent - I agree many of us can inadvertently skip over this first step, but
> it is foundational. As we are reminded in 1 Samuel 16:7, people can too
> easily get swayed by "outward appearance" and miss the more
> important matters of the heart. Carl - with regard to your question on how
> to work better as a team, I recommend looking at "The 17 Indisputable
> Laws of Teamwork: Embrace Them and Empower Your Team" by John C.
> Maxwell and "The Five Dysfunctions of a Team" by Patrick
> Lencioni.


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